2021 Corpus Christi & First Eucharist

Corpus Christi & First Eucharist 2021

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Pictures from Eucharistic procession at Saint Mary Magdalene.

 

What does “Corpus Christi” mean?
The words “Corpus Christi” mean “Body of Christ” and are another name for the “Solemnity of the Body and Blood of Christ” celebrated on the Sunday after Trinity Sunday. This solemnity marks with particular emphasis the doctrine of Christ’s real presence—body, blood, soul, and divinity—in the Eucharist.

What is a Corpus Christi procession?
The Corpus Christi procession, most often held on the Solemnity of the Body and Blood of Christ, is a “public witness of faith and worship of the Most Blessed Sacrament” (Holy Communion and Worship of the Eucharist Outside Mass [HCWEOM], n.101). Founded upon the Church’s belief that Jesus becomes substantially present to us in the Eucharist at Mass, the Corpus Christi procession is one of the ways that we express our devotion to Christ (Eucharistic adoration, Forty Hours devotions, and visits to the Blessed Sacrament are some other forms of devotion). A Corpus Christi procession usually begins after the celebration of Mass, at which the host for the procession is consecrated. Placed in a monstrance (a sacred vessel that displays the sacred host to the faithful), the Blessed Sacrament is then carried out of the church and through the streets of the city or neighborhood accompanied by the songs and prayers of the people. Often there are altars decorated along the route where the monstrance is placed and the people are blessed. In this way the Church shows that Christ, here among us, walks with us on our pilgrimage to heaven.